a certain necessity to alienation in order to activate something again

What is fascinating is that radio frequencies in those isolated places are amazingly rich, due to the military, due to the late reflection of SW signals, and of course due to the position in the geographical sense and isolation. Of course there is a myth that accompanies all these theories about being able to listen to natural phenomena and atmospheric reactions in VLF frequencies. I am not a scientist, that is why that doesn’t worry me, I believe in it.

For instance, in Borealis, a Fieldwork I shot in the tundra in Siberia, I recorded an aurora borealis with very low VLF signs, the sound was so beautiful and so synaesthetic on that special moment that it was a revelation, that responded in my mind to what I was seeing, whether that was the sound of an aurora borealis or not it is not important, for me it was, it was at that instant. That is what is magical about using radio frequencies, there is a certain ghostly and ethereal relation with the image. Somehow it is directly connected, sometimes it is magic…

Like in Smoke, another Fieldwork I filmed in Patagonia, where suddenly an AM programme started to transmit a tango classic at 4AM that was somehow filling the atmosphere too, in amazing ways. Of course I felt it so close to the image I was filming that it was somehow directing it, which brings me back to my collaboration with Phill Niblock that I will speak about later…

Is all this work about the sense of loneliness and alienation that can emerge, perversely, in an era in which we are all connected all of the time?

It is interesting that you speak about alienation because it is probably the key to understand both ends of the equation. Somehow it is a certain necessity to this alienation in order to activate something again, to understand some things we have lost, some things past, forgotten, and also a certain alienation in terms of subject, meaning that also because that extreme connectionness of the present, that this work is relevant. It alienates the spectator…

Entrevista con Carlos Casas en el blog de The Wire (adventures in modern music).

I am amazed with his fieldworks.